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The theme of Tuesday's speeches at the Republican National Convention was supposed to be "Make America Work Again." The evening was apparently intended to give the GOP a chance to highlight its plans to create more American jobs.

Somehow, though, most of the night's speakers decided to forego actually using the j-word or explaining the party's plans to get more Americans working and instead spent their allotted time demanding that Hillary Clinton be thrown in jail.

In his bizarre speech that was equal parts a Clinton witch-hunt and a booming round of call-and-response with the audience, Governor Chris Christie managed to mention jobs once, albeit within the context of more Clinton-bashing. The presumptive Democratic presidential nominee, he said, was committed to "putting big government spending financed by the Chinese ahead of jobs for middle class Americans."

At no point did he describe how a Donald Trump presidency would create jobs.

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Rather than standing out for being off-topic, Christie's remarks were emblematic of the rest of the evening.

Arkansas Governor Asa Hutchinson insisted that jobs were being created in his state, but again, did not say just how, if at all, Arkansas was being looked at as an example for the Trump campaign's plan for the country.

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Similarly, Ben Carson did his best to steer clear from the night's intended theme, opting instead to compare Hillary Clinton to Lucifer. Carson mentioned that Clinton once wrote a senior thesis about Saul Alinsky a writer best known for his involvement in counterculture political organizing.

"[Alinsky] wrote a book called Rules for Radicals. It acknowledges Lucifer, the original radical who gained his own kingdom," Carson said.  “Now think about that. This is our nation where our founding document, the Declaration of Independence, talks about certain inalienable rights that come from our creator; a nation where our Pledge of Allegiance says we are one nation under God. So are we willing to elect someone as president who has as their role model somebody who acknowledges Lucifer?”

Though most of the speeches veered off the work-focused theme of the evening, Donald Trump Jr., the politician's 38-year-old son, did manage to incorporate stories of how his father's acumen as a businessman could eventually become a part of his presidency were he to make it to the White House.

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"You want to know what kind of president he'll be? Let me tell you how he ran his businesses, and I know because I was there with him by his side on job sites, in conference rooms from the time I could walk," the younger Trump said. "He didn't hide out behind some desk in an executive suite. He spent his career with regular Americans."

He continued:

"[My father] hung out with the guys on construction sites, pouring sheet rock and hanging — pouring concrete and hanging sheet rock. He listened to them and he valued their opinions as much and often more than the guys from Harvard and Wharton locked away in offices away from the real work."

While Trump Jr.'s words certainly galvanized the crowd, the latter half of his speech caught the father of five a fair amount of flack for bearing a striking resemblance to ideas American Conservative writer Frank Buckley had penned in a previous article for the magazine.

It's important to note that Buckley was hired as a speechwriter for the Trump campaign, meaning that it's more than possible that he polished off some of his old lines and handed them off to Trump for tonight's event—something Buckley insists should not be thought of as plagiarism proper.

That being said, considering how much of Trump's speech centered around his relationship with his father and how he'd learned so much about the world of business from his experience with his father's companies, the fact that there was nary a mention of Buckley's assistance raised some eyebrows. Still, though, at least Donald Trump. Jr. didn't resort to "borrowing" an entire speech from the First Lady like his stepmother did last night.