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Vermont Senator and Democratic presidential candidate Bernie Sanders was at Georgetown University on Thursday to deliver a speech on what he does—and doesn't—mean when he calls himself a democratic socialist.

“I don’t believe government should take over the grocery store down the street or own the means of production,” Sanders said toward the end of his remarks. “But I do believe that the middle class and the working families of this country, who produce the wealth of this country, deserve a decent standard of living and that their incomes should go up, not down.”

The hour-long speech was an opportunity for Sanders to lay out his vision for the country while also confronting questions about his electability. The Republican field has been having a pretty good time of using Sanders' socialism as a punch line or an easy scare, but—despite Sanders' strong showing in national polls among likely Democratic votersother surveys suggest that a number of Americans may be reluctant to vote for someone who calls themselves a socialist.

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And it seems that these were the people Sanders was trying to reach by making the case that his views on social democracy—a strong minimum wage, higher corporate taxes, universal access to education—were already in line with American values.

It's an interesting question. To try to answer it, I pulled the major definitional statements about Sanders' views on democratic socialism and then dug around for polls about those issues to see how they lined up.

So do Americans actually like Sanders' definition of socialism even if they're wary of the word itself? Let's find out.

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Reducing inequality.

Here's what Sanders said:

Democratic socialism means that we must create an economy that works for all, not just the very wealthy.

And here's what a majority of Americans said about inequality, according to a 2014 Pew poll:

And here's what a majority of Americans said about wealth redistribution, according to a 2015 Gallup poll:

Verdict: It looks like a majority of Americans are kind of socialist when it comes to inequality and wealth redistribution, even if they wouldn't call themselves that.

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Education.

Here's what Sanders said:

Democratic socialism means that, in the year 2015, a college degree is equivalent to what a high school degree was 50 years ago—and that public education must allow every person in this country, who has the ability, the qualifications and the desire, the right to go to a public colleges or university tuition free.

And here's what Americans said about free tuition at state schools, according to a 2015 YouGov poll, an internet-based survey:

And here's what a majority of Americans said about helping college students leave school debt-free, according to the same poll:

Verdict: More Americans support tuition-free public college than oppose it, but there's no majority on that question. But when it comes to ensuring students can access a public education regardless of income—which is one of Sanders' major arguments for free public college—there's much more consensus.

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A living wage.

Here's what Sanders said:

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Democratic socialism means that if someone works forty hours a week, that person should not be living in poverty: that we must raise the minimum wage to a living wage—$15 an hour over the next few years.

And here's what Americans said about raising the minimum wage and their support for a hypothetical candidate for Congress, according to a 2014 Pew survey:

And here's what Americans said about raising the minimum wage to $15 an hour, according to a 2015 YouGov survey, an internet-based survey:

So while a majority of Americans support raising the minimum wage to $10.10 an hour, that support waivers somewhat when you reach up to $15. While state-level surveys have shown strong support for the $15 floor, national polls reveal a more mixed response among every group except Democrats.

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Paid leave for working families.

Here's what Sanders said:

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[Democratic socialism] means that we join the rest of the world and pass the very strong Paid Family and Medical Leave legislation now in Congress.

And here's what a majority of Americans said in a 2015 Associated Press/GfK poll on paid leave (sorry, no neat graphics for this one):

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Two-thirds [of total survey respondents] favor requiring all employers to give time off to employees after the birth of a child.

Verdict: A majority of Americans support bringing the U.S. into line with the rest of the world and offering some form of paid leave to all employees.

Taxes.

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Here's what Sanders said:

Democratic socialism means, that in a democratic, civilized society the wealthiest people and the largest corporations must pay their fair share of taxes.

And here's what a majority of Americans said about taxing the wealthy, according to a 2014 Pew poll:

And here's what a majority of Americans said about what corporations and the wealthiest Americans pay in taxes, according to a 2015 Pew survey:

Verdict: Hella socialist!

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While some of Sanders' more ambitious proposals—free public tuition, a $15 minimum wage—don't have majority support, much of his platform—higher taxes for corporations and wealthy Americans and expanding access to paid time off and affordable education—are already aligned with what voters say they want for the country.

Americans: already kind of socialist. Who knew?