Spencer Platt

I n 2015 alone, at least 1,000 people were killed by the police in the U.S., a figure highlighting the growing, nationwide call for increased police accountability.

As the public continues to agitate for police reform, the FBI has announced its plans to create a system to better track, analyze, and share information about every single instance of people being dying at the hands of the police.

In a statement provided to the Guardian, the FBI explained that there was an obvious need for "robust and complete information about encounters between law enforcement officers and citizens that result in a use of force."

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Starting next year, the FBI will begin to keep closer count of not only gun-related killings committed by the police, but all fatal, physical altercations, including those involving Tasers, traditional weapons, and physical force. Thorough reports of these incidents will include details pertaining to the cases, like the race, sex, and age, and any preexisting relationship between of the officers and victims involved.

Along with actually creating these reports and monitoring the statistics, the FBI will also make a point of periodically publishing its findings.

Up until now, various press outlets like the Guardian and The Washington Post were some of the only organizations keeping detailed track of murders at the hands of police with any regularity.

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It's important to point out that while the FBI will finally make an effort to openly share this information with an increased regularity, the onus of actually reporting officer-related killings is still on individual police departments.

Ultimately, this means that the new system will depend on transparency and honesty from the police and continued investigations from the press.