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Donald Trump can't stop making things up, apparently. Over the weekend he insisted multiple times to have witnessed "thousands and thousands" of New Jersey residents cheering the destruction of the World Trade Center, despite no evidence that such a scene ever occurred. He also claimed to have seen people jumping to their deaths from the burning buildings from his apartment, which is over four miles away. And he even had time to retweet some fake facts made up by a neo-Nazi.

Now, the New York Times has uncovered another fabrication surrounding Trump: his golf course made up a Civil War battle. The course, located at the Trump National Golf Club in Virginia, has a flagpole that overlooks the Potomac river. On the pole is a plaque that reads:

Many great American soldiers, both of the North and South, died at this spot. The casualties were so great that the water would turn red and thus became known as ‘The River of Blood.’

The inscription carries a message from Trump, as well, that says "It is my great honor to have preserved this important section of the Potomac River!"

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Here's a photograph.

A nice memorial, except no such thing ever happened, according to local historians.

"No. Uh-uh. No way. Nothing like that ever happened there,” Richard Gillespie, executive director of the Mosby Heritage Area Association, told the Times. An 1861 battle did occur 11 miles to the north, Gillespie said, a fact that was backed up by two other local experts.

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Gillespie would know, too: His specialty is the 1,800-square-foot chunk of Virginia that houses Trump's course.

Donald Trump's specialty, meanwhile, is not being wrong about things. When reached for comment, Trump said that the site was popular for river crossings and that people were probably shot trying to cross the river. When told the local historians disputed the plaque's veracity, Trump said "“How would they know that? Were they there?” Great point!

The plaque is located on between the 14th and 15th holes, so be sure and stop by after your $200,000 check for membership at the club clears.

David Matthews operates the Wayback Machine on Fusion.net—hop on. Got a tip? Email him: david.matthews@fusion.net