AP

All right, let’s recap:

On Tuesday, pictures from a recent photoshoot with media personality and comedian Kathy Griffin began circulating online—pictures that depict her hoisting the bloody, severed “head” of a prop dummy made up to look like President Donald Trump.

Faced with quickly mounting criticism and a lost promotional deal from a company that wants you to poop good, Griffin issued a hasty mea culpa, explaining: “I cross the line. I move the line, then I cross it. I went way too far.”

And that, in a world where people have bigger things to worry about than whether or not a comedian’s shtick is funny, should have been that.

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But we’re not that lucky.

On Wednesday morning, President Trump waded into decidedly unpresidential (but, in the context of mediocre reality tv star feuding with another mediocre reality tv star—wholly familiar) territory, tweeting Griffin “should be ashamed of herself,” and calling her “sick!”

Trump’s criticism echoed that of his eldest son, Donald Jr., who bemoaned Griffin’s photoshoot as “disgusting.”

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“Imagine a conservative did this to Obama as POTUS?” Don Jr. urged.

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Hmm, imagine indeed....

What if, let’s say, a popular(ish?) musician had stood before a crowd of fans, brandishing a pair of machine guns, and shouted: “Obama, he’s a piece of shit. I told him to suck on my machine gun”? And what if, for good measure, that same musician—for the sake of argument, let’s call him Ned Tugent—had also threatened then-Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton with those same guns, telling her directly that she “might want to ride one of these into the sunset, you worthless bitch.”

So what would Trump, a president deeply concerned with what’s in good taste, do in the face of such “disgusting” and “sick!” provocations?

Why, invite Ted Nugent to the Oval Office, of course:

Pro-Trump conservatives fueling this outrage cycle should probably just take the L on this one.