Info Wars/Youtube

If you ever wondered why the Smashing Pumpkins broke up at the height of their success, here might be a reason: Billy Corgan believes "social justice warriors" are analogous to Ku Klux Klan members.

Appearing on Alex Jones' Info Wars radio show, Corgan compared tolerating the current wave of rights activists to allowing the Klan to march. Via Pitchfork:

Let's go back to–and I'm sure you could find this–remember, what was this, around 1978, Skokie, heavily Jewish community north of Chicago. I was there growing up at the time when they let the KKK march down the street, and what was the big issue? It was a free speech issue. We don't like it. They're thumbing in our nose but, you know what, it's better to have an America where these idiots get to walk down the street and spout their hate.

He couldn't leave the Klan comparison alone, adding:

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…they are literally like a dumb Klan guy that just pulls over on some black guy walking home from work and kills him 'cause they're black. They want to just project something onto you.

He went on to compare left-leaning protesters to a Maoist "cult," calling them part of a "hashtag generation" living in a "fantasy" world.

…the lack of tolerance of ideas and other points of view is the great Achilles heel of the social justice warrior movement. They do not apply their philosophical bent across the board equally. That's what exposes them every time and you guys are doing a great job of exposing that but most people–most people–who are not down there at the rally and spinning their Twizzler and making up stories about ghosts that don't exist–and it's a lot of fantasy stuff going on there. I mean, it literally could be a wizard world convention.

Corgan has previously appeared on Info Wars to express his displeasure with the Obama administration, saying officials go “out of their way to stifle debate,” though added he doesn't lean "one side or the other" politically, according to Breitbart.

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Rob covers business, economics and the environment for Fusion. He previously worked at Business Insider. He grew up in Chicago.